Rest for the Weary

October 19, 2015

Planning anything is difficult, if not impossible, in rescue work. We take dogs when they need us and we never know when that will be or the number of dogs or pups that will be involved. Most of our dogs have come down from Attawapiskat over the last few years but we have also accepted dogs that have been surrendered to us by local owners as well as working with other rescue organizations when they require our help. Predictability in any of these areas is next to impossible. Add to that our inability to say "no" to a dog and you have a twelve year flow of dogs constantly in and out of our care. Imagine our surprise then when our wishful hopes for time off recently became a reality. 

Our many years of rescue work combined with three spay/neuter clinics have resulted in helping to drastically reduce the over-population of dogs in many northern communities. Dogs are still in need but the days of up to twenty waiting to come out at once seem to be over for now.

MPR began working in Moosonee and Moose Factory then moved on to Kashechewan and Fort Albany as needed. The efforts of several rescue organizations were impactful in these areas so we then focused on the more remote community of Attawapiskat. Once again a difference has been made and the dog situation has improved greatly thanks to both the residents and rescue workers. 

Because of our many resources, we are able to work in the more remote northern areas to bring dogs out and to send aid, such as dog food and veterinary medicine in. We hope to reach out to other communities that could benefit from what we offer but we need time to rest, refurbish, repair and improve both our facilities and ourselves first.  

Most importantly though, we need to spend time with our own seven dogs. For the first time in years they aren't sharing us or their space with rescue dogs. They have had to be a very fluid pack and they have done their jobs well, but they too are tired. 

Lady Rose came to us in 2008 and Stillwater in 2010 from the Mile 26 rescue and they were adults when they arrived. Both are bush dogs so telling their ages was difficult. Stillwater has gone through one surgery for mammary gland cancer and she is slowing down considerably. Lady Rose no longer runs the bush as wildly as she once did so she too must be in her senior years. 

Trillium came from a puppy mill in Quebec and she was worn out when I rescued her in 2006. She had just given birth to her last litter and guessing her age was impossible. She is now suffering from a collapsing trachea and the constant cough that accompanies the condition. We are simply trying to keep her comfortable for as long as we can.

Ruth is roughly eleven years old and she has seen almost all the rescue dogs come and go. She has been ready for a rest for quite some time now. Huck is nine and his heart murmur is taking a toll. This dog needs to be king of all kingdoms so his ego must be exhausting him as well. 

Will and Trumpet are the young ones of the pack and these boys know carefree abandon. Will suffers from brain damage but that does not diminish his pure and simple glee.

Our home has sheltered many,many dogs over the years and I can remember how each hole in the wall came to be and how each chew mark was made. I can, however, no longer claim they are charming or part of the character of the house. We need to repair, rest and regroup. We intend to take the winter months to plan our next stage of rescue work. The break will only last as long as the dogs in need allow though so everything could change in the blink of an eye. That too is fine with us.

I apologize to all who want to adopt from MPR for the delay in doing so but promise we shall return in full force shortly. Take care all. 

Sharron 

PLEASE CONSIDER OUR "DO NO HARM" MERCHANDISE AND MPR PRODUCT FOR CHRISTMAS GIFT GIVING. BOTH THE MESSAGE AND THE GIFT WILL BE GREATLY APPRECIATED I AM SURE. OUR CHRISTMAS CARDS WELCOME THE SEASON IN WITH HOPE AND JOY.